WHY IS
THERE NO
KORBAN PESACH TODAY?


Obviously, the destruction of the Beit Hamikdash (Temple in Jerusalem) and the restrictions imposed by conquerors on Jewish access Jerusalem and to the Temple Mount, resulted in the cessation of the Korban Pesach.

Yet the fact that there was no longer any Temple did not mean that one could not offer sacrifices, including the Korban Pesach. According to the Rambam, the sanctity of the Temple Mount remains. Not only is it possible to sacrifice the Korban Pesach, there remains an obligation to do so on the Temple Mount.

We have proof that the commandment of the Korban Pesach was observed, even after the destruction of the Temple. Rabban Gamliel who lived a hundred years after the destruction commanded his servant to roast the Korban Pesach (Pesachim 87b). Also, the Byzantine Caesar Yostaninos issued an edict forbidding the Jews from sacrificing the Korban Pesach as late as the Sixth Century of the Common Era, long after the destruction of The Temple. This shows the Jews were still offering the Korban Pessach long after the destruction.

With the loss of Jewish independence, the dispersal of the Jews throughout the world and, the severe persecutions endured by Jews who remained in the land under Christian and Muslim rulers (who sought to supersede Judaism physically as well as spiritually), the Temple Mount was made off-limits to Jews.

In addition to political and physical obstacles, observant Jews were also concerned by Jewish (Halachic) legal dilemmas such as ritual impurity. The Rambam (Maimonides) had already pronounced that if the majority of Jews were in a state of impurity they could perform sacrifices in such a condition (Beit Habekhira 16).

There was also concern about establishing the lineage of the priests and building an appropriate altar without employing steel tools as per the biblical injunction. In the same way that the Jews abandoned dreams about a Jewish government or a Jewish army, and performing commandments dependent upon being in the Land of Israel, the commandment of Korban Pesach was also set aside to be resumed only upon a miraculous return to Zion and the rebuilding of the Temple.

The dream of restoring the Korban Pesach remained unactualized despite the liberation of Jerusalem during the Six Day War. For political considerations, the government of Israel continued to entrust the Temple Mount to the Muslim authorities. This encouraged the Jewish religious leadership to adopt a policy of caution postponing the need to revive the Korban Pesach.


FROM THIS
ARTICLE

"According to the Rambam the sanctity of the Temple Mount remains. The Rambam writes, it is not only possible to sacrifice the Korban Pesach but there remains an obligation to do so on the Temple Mount. "

"Rabban Gamliel who lived a hundred years after the destruction of The Temple commanded his servant to roast the Korban Pesach"


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Korban Pesach Committee of the Sanhedrin Initiative