WHAT HAS CHANGED
THAT ENABLES US
TO OFFER THE
KORBAN PESACH NOW?


Recently, the Jewish people have begun to reassert their rights to the Temple Mount. They have been aided by technical progress and archaeological discoveries in solving the once insurmountable problem of determining the areas that can be visited by Jews even in a state of impurity, and which areas remained off limits. Modern technology such as laser cutting tools can solve the problem of constructing an altar without metallic tools.

However, the most important development has not been technological, but spiritual. The emergence of a Jewish religious leadership in the form of a renascent Sanhedrin Initiative has provided the breakthrough. A group of rabbinic leaders has summoned the courage to revive Jewish legal thought and authority in the framework of a renewed Jewish sovereignty. The new Sanhedrin Initiative is in the forefront of the drive to renew the Korban Pesach. It assumes responsibility for ensuring that the commandments are performed in conformity with Jewish religious law, and will also coordinate the practical details with the appropriate Israeli governmental authorities.

This year in Jerusalem, the Sanhedrin Initiative is calling upon the Jewish people in Israel and throughout the world to participate in the Korban Pesach. The Sanhedrin Initiative will choose sheep to be offered in the Korban Pesach, and all preparations will be made in the expectation that we can renew this ancient, traditional offering. In the event that political or other obstacles intervene, the Sanhedrin Initiative has taken halakhic precautions to ensure that the monies for purchasing the sheep can still be used for charitable donations.

Any person wishing to participate in the Korban Pesach can enroll himself and members of his family for the price of seven shekels per person --the estimated cost of a Kezayit of meat, the minimum portion necessary for fulfilling the commandment. The process will be supervised by licensed accountants, whether the monies will be used for the original purpose or will be donated to charity.

We realize that this approach is as controversial as it is courageous; passivity always appears the safer course, even if appearances are deceiving. The controversy is part of a fundamental debate whether the Jewish people must passively await their redemption which will be a one-shot deal or they are enjoined to make preparations and sacrifices in both senses of the word to prepare the stage for their redemption. If you subscribe to the second approach, then one can hardly find a cause more worthy than restoring the Korban Pesach to its pride of place as a symbol of Jewish unity.

 


FROM THIS
ARTICLE

"Technical progress and archaeological discoveries have help reveal the areas of the Temple Mount that can be visited by Jews, even in a state of impurity, and which areas remain off limits."

"Modern technology such as laser cutting tools can solve the problem of constructing an altar without metallic tools."

This year
in Jerusalem,
the renascent Sanhedrin Initiative calls upon Jews throughout the world to participate in the Korban Pesach project. You can sign up, and include members of your family, for seven shekels per person.


Copyright © 2007-2013. All rights reserved.
Korban Pesach Committee of the Sanhedrin Initiative